2018 Basically Beethoven Festival announced

38th annual series spotlights local composers, range of instruments in free concerts

We are thrilled to present the FREE 38th annual Basically Beethoven Festival on Sunday afternoons in July. For 2018, FACP will produce FIVE FREE CONCERTS. Held in the Dallas Arts District at Moody Performance Hall (formerly Dallas City Performance Hall), every program starts with a Rising Star Recital at 2:30 pm followed by a Feature Performance at 3 pm. Rising Star Recitals present local, gifted young musicians; Feature Performances showcase professional musicians from the area. All concerts are FREE TO THE PUBLIC. Paid parking is available in surface lots and garages in the Dallas Arts District. Families with children are welcome.

“For 2018, I wanted to highlight masterpieces from the past and the present across a variety of instrumentations and settings,” explains Basically Beethoven Festival Director Dr. Alex McDonald. Indeed, that has been accomplished with the five concerts anchored by a string quartet on July 1, a flute trio on July 8, pianos and percussion on July 15, a horn ensemble on July 22, and an operatic bass closing the Festival on July 29.

“Classical music not only has a vibrant tradition—it also has an exciting future! That is why we are using several of the concerts to showcase gifted, young composers from across the metroplex,” McDonald added. “Something I’m particularly excited about this year is our Rising Stars, who represent part of the future of classical music. In the past, we have always used a young soloist with an adult accompanist, but this year we are presenting collaborative duos: two young artists performing together. Some of our performers are only 14 years old and have already played all over the world!”

 

July 1, Eclectet

  • Rising Star Recital: Student musician Josephine Chiu, piano, will be joined on stage by the professional musicians of the afternoon’s Feature Performance (below) and Scott Sheffler, bass. They will perform a chamber arrangement of Beethoven’s Piano Concerto No. 5.
  • Feature Performance: Florence Wang, violin; Sean Riley, violin; Rachel McDonald, viola; Joseph Kuipers, cello, come together to perform works by Dvorak, Ravel, Haydn, Beethoven and local composer Quinn Mason. Mason was raised in Dallas, is a Dallas ISD graduate, and a former FACP scholarship student. He has won numerous awards for his compositions, and he was a recipient of the Rogene Russell Scholarship Fund in its inaugural year.

 

July 8, Diversions & Escapes

  • Rising Star Recital: Shiv Yajnik is recognized for his accomplishments as a pianist and as a composer during this Rising Star Recital. He will perform Liszt’s Francis Walking on the Waves, and his own composition, Piano Trio: Ondine. He will be joined onstage by professional musicians Jen Chang Betz, violin, and Joseph Kuipers, cello.
  • Feature Performance: A piano trio composed of Shauna Thompson, flute; Deborah Brooks, cello; and Shields-Collins Bray, piano, will tackle the piece Diversions and Escapes by local composer Martin Blessinger; and Flute Trio selections by Haydn and Rorem. Ms. Brooks and Mr. Bray will pair up onstage to perform the first movement from Beethoven’s Sonata op. 5 no. 2.

 

July 15, Pianos & Percussion

  • Rising Star Recital: Matthew Ho, violin, and Claire Chiang, piano, will perform works by Beethoven, Ravel, and more.
  • Feature Performance: Catherine Lysinger, piano, and Alex McDonald, piano, present Rachmaninoff’s Suite No. 2 for Two Pianos. They will be joined by percussionists Dan Florio and Brian Jones on Bartok’s Sonata for Two Pianos and Percussion.

 

July 22, Four Hornsmen of the Apocalypse

  • Rising Star Recital: William Sprinkle, oboe, and Eduardo Rojas, piano, will perform the second movement (“Largo”) from Beethoven’s Oboe Concerto, Hess 12; and his “Adelaïde”, op. 46.
  • Feature Performance: French horn ensemble Four Hornsmen of the Apocalypse have captivated audiences with their musicianship and joviality. Members include local musician Gerry Wood, with Paul Blackstone, Brian Brown, and Audrey Good. The ensemble will present opera transcriptions.

 

July 29, Art Song

  • Rising Star Recital: Local composer Jason Mulligan will be the featured Rising Star as a composer. Alex McDonald will perform selections from Mulligan’s piano preludes, he will premiere a Mulligan piece, and he will accompany soprano Alissa Roca for Mulligan’s “In the Looking Glass.”
  • Feature Performance: Operatic bass Jared Schwartz with The Dallas Opera’s Music Director of Education Mary Dibbern, piano, performs an afternoon of art song, including works by Flégier, Fauré, and Liszt.

The Basically Beethoven Festival is made possible in part by VisitDallas, City of Dallas Office of Cultural Affairs, TACA, Texas Commission on the Arts, WFAA Channel 8, DART, Dallas Arts District Foundation, and ExxonMobil Community Summer Jobs Program. Since 1981, FACP has presented free classical music programs open to the public. In addition to the Basically Beethoven Festival, FACP presents free, monthly Bancroft Family Concerts October through May at the Dallas Museum of Art.  Since its inception, FACP has served over 225,000 children and performed for over a half-million residents of North Texas.



Now Hear This: an Interview with Kimberly Cole Luevano

2016 Kimberly Cole LuevanoKimberly Cole Luevano, associate professor of clarinet at the University of North Texas,
answered these questions for FACP’s discerning audience. Kim, with soprano Lindsay Kesselman and pianist Midori Koga as Haven Trio, performs at our upcoming Bancroft Family Concert series at the Dallas Museum of Art’s Horchow Auditorium on November 12. Doors open at 2:30 for the 3:00 concert. As always, the concert is free. The program boasts the WORLD PREMIERE of Jon Magnussen’s TWINGE, songs inspired by survivors from the 2004 Indonesian tsunami.


Haven Trio and Jon Magnussen received a grant from Chamber Music America for him to compose this song cycle specifically for you three musicians. What was that process like? Did Jon present it to you as a finished work, or was there some back-and-forth? One of the really fun parts about working with living composers is that it truly becomes a collaborative process. Jon heard our performances and knew what our collective and individual strengths were, so he had that in mind as he wrote. If he had a question about something or wasn’t sure if it would work, he asked us. We met in August to play through the work for the first time, and after that, Jon made a few more adjustments.

Haven Trio is described as “a refuge for the creation of new music for soprano, clarinet, and piano.” How did you come to focus on contemporary chamber music? We all love all styles and genres of music, but I think it’s fair to say that we all like the process of bringing a piece to life from the initial stages of working with composers in composition, to performing the work, to introducing audiences to contemporary works. We tend to perform music of composers who know us well and are not afraid to tell us exactly what their vision of a work is. These same composers also know our strengths and can, therefore, write well for us. In our careers, we have found that listeners may be ‘scared’ of contemporary music. Ideally, we want to create music and present it so that audiences feel connected to the music.

You live in the Dallas area, but Lindsay is in North Carolina and Midori lives in Canada. How did the three of you meet and form Haven Trio? How do you work on music together? Is there a lot of traveling, or do you Skype? Well, it is a long story of how we met! Midori and I played together in a different contemporary music group for over 10 years when we both lived in Michigan. After that group stopped performing, Midori and I continued to perform, but she was in Toronto by that point. (Michigan and Toronto—still not so far apart.) Lindsay, Midori, and I then began to collaborate when Lindsay and I taught at the same institution in Michigan. We found we really had terrific chemistry, a similar outlook in our approaches, and we really love performing together. Even when new jobs and life decisions drew us to geographically distant places, we wanted to continue collaborating. Typically, we do 10-day “residencies” twice a year when we come together for a series of concerts in a single location. We do some Skype-type work, but we also do lots of recording of our own parts that we send to each other for help in preparation. When we arrive in the concert place, we have time to rehearse, but since we’ve recorded and listened lots to each other’s parts by that point, we can get right to music-making and interpretive decisions.

Do you find that being a teacher influences you as a performer? If so, how? I tell my students, “Teaching educates my performance; performing educates my teaching.” I couldn’t imagine doing one without the other. If I am guiding my students to reach musical decisions or to incorporate certain ideals or aesthetics for effective performances, I am reminded that I must always do the same!

How old were you when you started playing the clarinet? Why did you choose it? I started playing the clarinet in my public school band program in New Mexico when I was 8 years old. I am grateful to my band directors—I wouldn’t be a musician today were it not for their guidance. I was lucky to begin private lessons when I was 12 years old. I hate to say it, but I chose clarinet because my older sister played flute! I didn’t really know enough to have a good reason to pick it! However, I truly love the clarinet sound and color—I can’t imagine playing any other instrument at this point.

What types of music do you like to share with your kids? What type of music do they like? We listen to all kinds of music at home. Honestly, my children prefer popular music to classical, but both play instruments and have studied music their entire lives. When I’m not teaching or playing, I typically listen to something other than classical music (since that’s what I hear almost all day). I love jazz and world music—especially Brazilian music.

Who’s your favorite composer to listen to? To play? Whatever composer’s music I am currently working on. Truly, I don’t have a favorite—there is so much wonderful, moving music!

What’s your favorite sound (musical or non-musical)? Least favorite? I love sounds of nature—waterfalls, birds singing, wind rustling through trees, rainstorms. Least favorite? Fingernails on a chalkboard.

Once you leave this world and reach the pearly gates, what celestial concert are you looking forward to? That’s a tough choice! If it were possible to hear the premiere (or one of the original performances) of Beethoven’s Symphony No. 9, that would be amazing, I’m sure. But I wouldn’t say no to Bach at the organ… or Mozart at the piano.


WORLD PREMIERE: TWINGE by Jon Magnussen

Award-winning Haven Trio performs new music inspired by survival stories of Indonesian tsunami

Photo courtesy of Haven Trio

Photo courtesy of Haven Trio

Part of our free Bancroft Family Concert Series, Haven Trio’s WORLD PREMIERE of Jon Magnussen’s TWINGE, songs inspired by survival tales of the 2004 Indonesian tsunami, takes place on Saturday, November 12.  Held in the Horchow Auditorium at the Dallas Museum of Art (1717 N. Harwood Street, Dallas 75201), the program begins at 3 p.m. with doors opening at 2:30 p.m. The concert is FREE TO THE PUBLIC with no tickets required. PLEASE NOTE: the multimedia performance includes tsunami-related imagery which may contain strong thematic elements. Audience discretion is advised, particularly for families with young children.

Haven Trio (Professor of Clarinet at University of North Texas Kimberly Cole Luevano, soprano Lindsay Kesselman, and pianist Midori Koga) and Magnussen received a grant from Chamber Music America to commission the composer to write the piece for the trio. Several years before, Magnussen had read Barry Bearak’s New York Times magazine article “The Day the Sea Came” about the stories of survivors of the 2004 Indonesian tsunami.  He was so moved that he knew he would someday set the stories to music: this has become TWINGE.